• AMRI

    Triage for Australia's lizards and snakes

    Which of Australia’s endangered species need our most urgent attention? This was the question facing a group of conservation biologists, including two scientists from the Australian Museum Research Institute, following the most recent round of Red Data Book assessments of our reptiles.

  • Museullaneous

    Hurley and the Torres Strait Diver

    New research by art historian Ann Elias in her book Coral Empires uncovers the full story behind photographer Frank Hurley's iconic images of pearl diving in the Torres Strait in the 1920s.

  • AMRI

    A tad mysterious: The identity of five fabulous funnel-mouthed tadpoles revealed

    When it comes to surveying for rare and threatened frog species, it’s important to be able to identify the tadpoles too!

  • AMRI

    This month in Archaeology: When did dingoes first come to Australia?

    For this month’s blog, we examine a paper recently published by Loukas Koungoulos and Melanie Fillios in the Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, in order to answer the question: when did dingoes first come to Australia?

  • AMRI

    Hopping to it: 200,000 frog records in three years of FrogID

    With the help of citizen scientists, a 3 cm-sized threatened Sydney frog has been verified as the 200,000th record for the Australian Museum’s national FrogID project.

  • AMRI

    The Leaf-litter Frog mystery in the Cardamom Mountains, Cambodia

    Although Leaf-litter Frogs are found throughout the forests of Southeast Asia, only a single individual had been recorded in the Cardamom Mountains. This has now changed, with the scientific discovery of the Cardamom Leaf-Litter Frog, named in honour of Cambodian Herpetologist Thy Neang.

  • AMRI

    A new “type” of Pig-footed Bandicoot

    The original description of the now extinct Australian Pig-footed Bandicoot was based on one specimen, since lost, from which the tail was missing. New research, from the Australian Museum and Western Australian Museum, has nominated a replacement…

  • AMRI

    Chasing endemic land snails on Lord Howe Island

    Climbing high mountains, leaping out of boats, winching out of helicopters … we are prepared to do it all, and more, for endemic snails!

  • AMRI

    Worms under the hammer

    Collected thousands of metres below the ocean surface off the coast of Eastern Australia, two new species of deep-sea worm have been discovered. Learn how an unusual auction helped scientists at the Australian Museum and the University Museum of Bergen name these worms.

  • AMRI

    Angels in disguise

    Why do some fishes hybridize, while others don’t? A recent collaborative study with the University of Sydney, Australian Museum and University of Queensland, has asked this question of marine angelfishes. They found that hybridisation of these fishes is more widespread than previously thought.

  • AMRI

    This month in Archaeology: Three different early humans coexisted in South Africa … around 2 million years ago

    A team of scientists, led by Prof Andy Herries, recently discovered three different hominin species—Australopithecus, Paranthropus, and the earliest-known Homo erectus—lived in the same place at the same time.

  • AMRI

    Who am I? The larval sunfish mystery

    Isn’t this the cutest fish you have ever seen? At only 2 mm in length, this larval sunfish is one of three species of Mola found in Australian waters. The question is: which one is it?

  • AMRI

    Prehistoric sea scorpions once terrorised Australia

    A new study has revealed an unexpected diversity of fossil sea scorpions (distant cousins of modern-day scorpions) that once swam across Australia, between 390–436 million years ago.

  • AMRI

    Good news for one of the most threatened frogs in the world

    No longer known from just a single mountain top: expeditions in the mountains of northern Vietnam discover new locations for a rare frog.

  • AMRI

    The amazing detective story of an exotic worm’s journey

    How did a worm in Japan also occur in France? And what do oysters have to do with it? Pat Hutchings and Nicolas Lavesque delve into the story of an exotic worm to find the answers.