• AMRI

    Head to Toes: The Treatment Undergoes!

    In Part 2 of this special AM blog series, Melissa Holt tells us about the treatment process for two of the Egyptian cartonnage objects which includes x-ray analysis and tear repairs!

  • AMRI

    The discovery of an exceptional new fossil site offers a glimpse into Australia’s ancient rainforests

    New fossil site offers unprecedented insight into Australian landscape, approximately 15 million years ago.

  • AMRI

    Earthworms can sometimes surprise us

    Australia is richly endowed with earthworm biodiversity, but of the 750 or so named species of earthworm in Australia, very few have been found in arid environments. The Broken Hill earthworm, a new genus and species, was a serendipitous find in an unexpected location. Find out more at the AM!

  • AMRI

    Discoveries and disruptions: 2021 in AMRI

    2021 was an unprecedented year for many: despite COVID-19 disruptions and restrictions, AMRI scientists discovered an unprecedented number of species, published at a new record, carried out fieldwork, and engaged with the public in our citizen science programs.

  • AMRI

    News from LIRS: Marine pollution research

    Each month, a selected blog from Lizard Island Reef Research Foundation (LIRRF) is featured at the AM. LIRRF supports scientific research & education at the AM’s Lizard Island Research Station on the Great Barrier Reef. For this month, we feature: Marine pollution research.

  • AMRI

    Digitising the treasures of the sea

    The Australian Museum is digitising its collections, including the historic and diverse Marine Invertebrate collection. We explain how the Museum is opening up its treasure trove of specimens to the world and the discoveries we are making along the way.

  • AMRI

    Celebrating a decade of DigiVol!

    DigiVol, the World’s first citizen science website for digitising museum collections, turns 10! Today we celebrate our volunteers, staff and all the brilliant collections that make this project so unique.

  • AMRI

    More than a snail’s pace: Progress on Norfolk Island’s threatened snails

    There have been moments of excitement and moments of despair along the way, but six months after starting a zoo-based breeding program for two Critically Endangered land snail species from Norfolk Island, the population is stable and progressing well.

  • AMRI

    How to hijack climate change: Tips from vagrant fish

    Hotter and drier summers in Australia bring with them massive fires, successive bleaching on coral reefs and widespread die-offs of our valuable kelp forests. Although all may seem doom and gloom in our oceans, some species are surprisingly resourceful and can even take advantage of warmer waters.

  • AMRI

    Chew on this! The diet of an extinct "panda-like" marsupial from New Guinea

    What did the “Beast of Huli" eat? The diet of this bizarre extinct marsupial, which had similarities to both giant wombats and pandas, has remained a mystery. PhD student Joshua White, with coauthors, examined the teeth of this species to help answer these questions.

  • AMRI

    Naming the nameless

    Correctly naming an organism is fundamental – it is important for all subsequent studies on that species and yet a significant percentage of Australian marine species have not been described. Our scientists explain why we must name the nameless!

  • AMRI

    Bleating or screaming? Two new, very loud, frog species described in eastern Australia

    With the help of vital FrogID audio, two new species of frog, each with a call as loud and piercing as each other, are described as new to science.

  • AMRI

    News from LIRS: Outcomes of the Polychaete Workshop eight years on

    Each month, a selected blog from Lizard Island Reef Research Foundation (LIRRF) is featured at the AM. LIRRF supports scientific research & education at the AM’s Lizard Island Research Station on the Great Barrier Reef. For this month, we feature: Outcomes of the Polychaete Workshop eight years on.

  • AMRI

    The Flowering of Australia’s Rainforests

    Invertebrates are essential in pollinating our rainforests – but how do climate change, fire, fragmentation, invasive species and destructive pathogens impact pollination networks? Dr Geoff Williams OAM, AM, explores how in this Second Edition of The Flowering of Australia’s Rainforests.

  • AMRI

    What do you call one of the world’s most beautiful frogs?

    Are some spectacular tree frogs from China and Vietnam two, remarkably similar species, or only one? An international team of herpetologists, including the AM’s Dr Jodi Rowley, solves this mystery once and for all!