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A bespoke pattern device has been developed to form part of the Australian Museum's core identity system. The pattern creates an instant visual cue across all communications, working to align and support the masterbrand.

The brand pattern should be incorporated into all communications consistently. There is flexibility within the system to ensure the pattern works seamlessly across all content and communication types.

Below outlines how the brand pattern was designed and how to use it. Downloadable assets and examples of the pattern are also included.



Pattern Development

A standardised pattern has been created for use on all AM branded communications. The pattern acts as an extension of the logomark and is a recognisable element of our identity system.

Pattern have been created that synergise with the core identity system and do not complete or overpower content. The brand pattern should always remain recognisable as belonging to the AM.


Brand Pattern Development 01

A branded pattern device has been developed from elements of the Australian Museum logo mark.

Image: Australian Museum
© Australian Museum

Brand Pattern Development 02

By extending and repeating recognisable elements, a consistent master brand pattern has been developed.

Image: Australian Museum
© Australian Museum

Master Pattern

Master brand pattern in full.

Image: Australian Museum
© Australian Museum

  • Master Brand Pattern Tile 01
    Crop of master brand pattern – 1/3 Image: Australian Museum
    © Australian Museum
  • Master Brand Pattern Tile 02
    Crop of master brand pattern – 2/3 Image: Australian Museum
    © Australian Museum
  • Master Brand Pattern Tile 03
    Crop of master brand pattern – 3/3 Image: Australian Museum
    © Australian Museum

Using the Brand Pattern

While designed as a single graphic element, the master brand pattern is not intended be displayed in full on a single layout, rather crops of the pattern are to be used, allowing for variation and flexibility in the identity system.

The master brand pattern can be scaled, edited and rotated to suit the required application. Content heavy layouts can feature less of the pattern while simple layouts can feature pattern rich designs.


Master Brand Pattern Crops 01

The master brand pattern cropped for different layout proportions.

Image: Australian Museum
© Australian Museum

Master Brand Pattern Crops 02

The brand pattern can be rotated 90˚ to fit landscape/portrait orientations as required.

Image: Australian Museum
© Australian Museum

To ensure consistently the pattern should be scaled so that 6-8 units fit along the longest edge of the media. Each peak is classified as 1 unit. The pattern should only ever be rotated 90˚ from its original register to ensure visual alignment.

Avoid overlapping the pattern with any logos. The pattern should complement and not distract from the content. If necessary, individual parts of the pattern can be deleted or moved to suit the layout.


Brand Pattern Templates 01

Template showing placement and scale of brand pattern on typical layouts.

Image: Australian Museum
© Australian Museum

Brand Pattern Templates 02

Template showing brand pattern in combination with other identity elements.

Image: Australian Museum
© Australian Museum

The brand pattern can be applied in any combination of brand colours, including the tints. To limit the creation of non-AM colours, avoid using transparencies on solid colours.

The brand pattern can work with photography, illustration or stand alone as a design treatment however it doesn't interplay with these elements, it either sits behind or in front.


Brand Pattern Examples 01

Examples of the brand pattern in use. Note how each pattern has been edited to suit the layout.

Image: Australian Museum
© Australian Museum

Brand Pattern Examples 02

The brand pattern can be applied more minimally so as to avoid overpowering the content where appropriate.

Image: Australian Museum
© Australian Museum

Brand Pattern Examples 03

Objects and photography can be layered over the pattern for visual effect.

Image: Australian Museum
© Australian Museum