Scientist for a Day Palaeontologist - 21 January 2021

Step into the shoes of an Australian Museum scientist and experience a jam-packed day of curiosity, learning and experimentation in this school holiday workshop for young and inquisitive minds.

Image: Anna Kučera
© Australian Museum

This event has sold out. See what else is on for the winter school holidays.

Ages: 8 - 12 years

Ever wondered what it would be like to work as a professional scientist? Step into the shoes of an Australian Museum scientist and experience a jam-packed day of curiosity, learning and experimentation in this school holiday workshop for young and inquisitive minds.

Children aged 8 – 12 are invited to delve into the incredible world of wildlife genetics with real geneticists from the Australian Centre for Wildlife Genomics at the Australian Museum Research Institute. Through interactive investigation, budding scientists will learn about genetics, explore Wild Planet and undertake a strawberry DNA extraction – all while being guided by experts in the field. Go behind-the-scenes and see where the real science happens!



  • Hat
  • Water bottle
  • Lunch and snacks

Please refer to the AM's refund policy here. Discounted Members tickets will be verified with Members registered for Family Membership benefits. Members Benefits are for registered Members only (kids and /or adults).



Dr Greta Frankham

Greta Frankham - Post Doctoral Researcher, ACWG

Dr Greta Frankham is a conservation geneticist and wildlife forensic scientist at the Australian Centre for Wildlife Genomics (ACWG) at the Australian Museum Research Institute.

Image: Abram Powell
© Australian Museum

Dr Greta Frankham is a conservation geneticist and wildlife forensic scientist at the Australian Centre for Wildlife Genomics (ACWG) at the Australian Museum Research Institute.

Prior to joining the ACWG, Greta's academic research focused on better understanding the population genetics and molecular evolution of threatened Australian marsupial species to aid in conservation management of these species. Since joining the ACWG in 2011, Greta has continued to work in this area, carrying out and contributing to research on a range of Australian species including; long nosed potoroos, eastern pygmy possums, long nosed bandicoots, koalas (as part of the Koala Genome Consortium), echidnas, red-tail black cockatoos and shingleback lizards.


Dr Matthew Lott

Matthew Lott - AMRI-USYD Postdoctoral Fellow, ACWG

Dr Dr Matthew Lott is Technical Officer, Australian Centre for Wildlife Genomics.

Image: Abram Powell
© Australian Museum

Dr Matthew Lott's major research interests lie in the use of genomics to inform evidence-based management of Australian wildlife. His PhD explored the use of high-throughput molecular techniques to characterise community structure and function, clarify taxonomic and evolutionary relationships, and quantify the effects of captive management practices on symbiotic interactions in species of both commercial and conservation significance.

In his role at the ACWG, he has overseen a number of research projects examining the mechanisms underlying population structure and functional genetic diversity in endemic Australian marsupials such as the koala and the bilby. He has also worked closely with the aviation industry to perform DNA-based species identifications of wildlife specimens involved in airstrike incidents, in an effort to develop more effective preventative management strategies.


Dr Caitlin Morrison

Caitlin Morrison - PhD Student, ACWG
Caitlin Morrison - PhD Student, Australian Centre for Wildlife Genomics Image: Abram Powell
© Australian Museum

After an undergraduate degree in molecular biology, Caitlin completed an Honours project studying the historic genetic diversity of the critically endangered northern hairy-nosed wombat. Following that, Caitlin undertook a PhD in wildlife genetics, based at the University of Sydney and at the Australian Museum in the Australian Centre for Wildlife Genomics.

Dr Caitlin Morrison has as undergraduate degree in molecular biology and has completed an Honours project studying the historic genetic diversity of the critically endangered northern hairy-nosed wombat. Caitlin has also undertaken a PhD in wildlife genetics, based at the University of Sydney and at the Australian Museum in the Australian Centre for Wildlife Genomics.


Dr David Alquezar

David Alquezar - Manager, Australian Centre for Wildlife Genomics.

Dr David Alquezar is Manager of the Australian Centre for Wildlife Genomics (ACWG).

Image: Abram Powell
© Australian Museum

Dr David Alquezar is molecular biologist with a strong research background in virology assay development, emerging virus discovery and museum genomics. He has broad interests in human and animal welfare through molecular genetic approaches that span across wildlife conservation, infectious diseases and forensic biology.

In his current role at the Australian Museum, he manages the Australian Centre for Wildlife Genomics (ACWG), which is responsible for oversight of key scientific and research infrastructure, comprising of the Australian Museum’s Frozen Tissue Collection and four NATA accredited (ISO/IEC 17025) molecular laboratories that provide a platform for scientific research at the Australian Museum via DNA technologies.


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