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April School Holidays kids activities

Scientist for a Day is a unique, interactive day of science fun for kids aged 8 to 12, including games, activities and experiments.

Image: Cordelia Hough
© Australian Museum

Ages: 8 - 12 years

Sydney’s favourite day of immersive science for kids is back these school holidays! This time, it’s all about mammals!

What do echidnas, koalas and humans have in common? We’re all mammals! In this full day workshop, explore the exhibition Wild Planet, then join real-life mammalogist Dr Sandy Ingleby and go behind the scenes of the collections of the Australian Museum Research Institute to discover what makes these hairy, big-brained animals so special, and why the biggest one of all lives in the sea.

Scientist for a Day is a unique, interactive day of science fun for kids aged 8 to 12, including games, activities and experiments.



  • Hat
  • Water bottle
  • Bag
  • Lunch and snacks – weather permitting, lunch will take place in Cook and Phillip Park (across the road from the Australian Museum)
  • Any required medication

Please refer to the AM's refund policy here. Discounted Members tickets will be verified with Members registered for Family Membership benefits. Members Benefits are for registered Members only (kids and /or adults).



About Dr Sandy Ingleby

Mammalogy

Dr Sandy Ingleby is a zoologist and the mammal collection manager at the Australian Museum.

Image: Nick Langley
© Australian Museum

Dr Sandy Ingleby is a zoologist and the mammal collection manager at the Australian Museum. As a collection manager, she is responsible for developing and maintaining the Museum’s mammal collection, facilitating access to the collection for visiting researchers, managing loans, as well as providing mammal expertise to the Museum’s public programs, and answering public and scientific enquiries.

Dr Ingleby has a broad interest in the ecology and evolution of Australian and Pacific mammals. While employed at the Museum she has participated in various surveys including those documenting the fauna of western NSW and of the southwest pacific region, with emphasis on Fiji and Solomon Islands.

Her PhD project involved extensive travel in northern Australia to document the distribution, diet and habitat preferences of two small macropod species, the Northern Nailtail Wallaby and Spectacled Hare Wallaby. Other experience includes working for the New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service as part of a team examining the effects of logging on small mammals and as a research assistant for a field study of the behavioural ecology of Grevy’s Zebra in Northern Kenya.


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View our full COVID-19 safety information here.